Monday, July 05, 2010

THR_33 Setup


The robots ready for their big trip.


Packing the robots (very carefully) in the case we got for them. After all that, TSA at Detroit airport partially disassembled our robots, then flung the parts they had taken off inside the shells and badly packed them up again. We didn't know till we got to Kyoto. They undid a bunch of nuts - so the robots shipped with Arduinos and sensors rattling around inside them. They also undid the toast mechanism. So our first morning at the Museum was spent fixing the robots.


Taisuke Murakami made the system that allows the tea-house "eyes" to be driven by the OMRON Smile Scan. Here he is pictured explaining to us how to connect the system.

"Designed for objective and quantitative evaluation of smiles, “Smile Scan” utilizes Omron’s “OKAO Vision” face sensing technology. The technology relies on facial data gathered from over 1 million people, accumulated through over 10 years of study of the human face. The system measures the degree of a person’s smile from a camera-recorded facial image based on its original criteria using facial key point movements. The resulting data is displayed onscreen with a percentage reading from 0% to 100%."

In THR_33 this percentage controls how much the tea-house "eyes" open.


Day 2. Unpacking the tea-house crate. The Museum staff were "amused" by the fact that we used 4 different kinds of screws (Phillips, 2 sizes of Torx and Robertson) and put them in from every possible angle (including from underneath). They are more used to unpacking delicate and valuable objets d'art - MoMAK chief curator Shinji Kohmoto (pictured on the right, arms outstretched) said they could enjoy this because it was "wild".


MoMAK's excellent team go to work on the tea-house structure...


... done.


We have integrated the Smile Scan with the tea-house and had it working - tomorrow we need to get everything in its final place and get the robot platforms in.

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I am exploring a hybrid form of art and design practice through the use of computer-based design and fabrication tools. I am interested in experimental objects and spaces that are dynamic and responsive and seek to challenge perceptions, expectations and established behavior.

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